New York Net Metering Cap Suspended For Now

Adding to the distributed energy/net metering debate involving utilities and solar panel owners, New York State for now has lifted the cap on net metering.

pv-magazine reported last week that New York regulators have suspended the existing cap on the state’s net metering program. This suspension will remain in effect until a new valuation is concluded under the Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) process.

Among other goals for 2030, New York’s REV is targeting 50% of all New York’s energy will be generated from renewable sources.

New York will continue to install solar under net metering until REV is finished, regardless of caps. Regarding impact on distributed energy providers, the New York Public Service Commission (NYPSC) ruled that utilities must continue to enroll solar PV systems in the state’s net metering program under its existing policies.

“The Commission orders:

“1. Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corporation, Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc., New York State Electric & Gas Corporation, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation d/b/a National Grid, Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc., and Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation are directed to file, by October 30, 2015, tariff leaves implementing revisions to the ceilings on the interconnection of net metered generation in conformance with the requirements set forth in the body of this Order. The tariff leaves shall become effective November 6, 2015.”

Alternative energy via shutterstock_108014018

“The convention of net metering has proven a very successful tool to support the growth of the solar industry, and Staff recommends that it continue to be used,” noted NYPSC staff in a REV white paper issued last July.

For now, rooftop solar owners will be satisfied with the NYPSC ruling.

Image: solar panels, via Shutterstock

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  • Frank

    If you want to see the future, look at Hawaii. First of all, there is no end to this, so the caps get pushed up until it actually becomes a problem. Then the inverters get more sophisticated, and not put too much voltage on the line. My advice, start working on TOU pricing now. Oh, and that rumble you hear in the distance? Even lower cost systems riding on battery packs.